MEDICAL SCHOOL INTERVIEW

Medical School Interview Questions - MMI Circuits

Here are some more FREE MMI stations for you to practice. You may wish to work in pairs for this activity with one student being the examiner and the other the applicant. This is a timed exercise. You have 7 minutes per station with a 2-minute break per station.

  • The examiner reads the question to the student. The station is a total of 7 minutes including the time the examiner takes to ask the question.

  • The questions have a degree of vagueness about them. This is deliberate as to allow a spectrum of responses from candidates.

  • The student may wish the examiner to repeat the question, or pause for thought. We would advise no extra time is allowed for this. This would therefore reduce the time the student has to respond.

  • The examiner is permitted to define terms or help clarify instructions should the candidate be uncertain.

  • At 7 minutes, the examiner must stop. A pause of 1 minute should pass before proceeding to the next question.

  • No feedback should be provided during the MMI interview.

Station 1

You are a doctor working in a busy accident and emergency department. A patient is booked in to see you. You have no records of his past history and no reason documented for his attendance. It transpires he is deaf and blind. How would you proceed?

Station 2

Medicine has a caring side as well as a scientific one. Tell me a situation, perhaps that you have seen in your work experience, where the caring side took precedence over the medical side?

Station 3

You are working on a medical ward in a busy NHS hospital. A tourist who is on holiday here in the UK is admitted critically ill and needing an urgent transplant. Without this the patient will not survive. The transplant is refused by the local NHS because the patient is not a UK resident. What are your views on this decision?

Station 4

One of the desirable qualities of a doctor is to show empathy towards patients. Why do you think this might be the case?

Station 5

You are the doctor on a busy medical ward. You have been asked to administer the first dose of a new antibiotic to a patient in case he has any adverse side effects. You administer the antibiotic, and all appears well. You then realise you have given the antibiotic to the wrong patient. What do you do?

Station 6

Unfortunately, it is an established fact that some students will not complete the first year at medical school and drop out of the course. How do we know you will not be one of them?

Station 7

The BMA is holding its doctors strike tomorrow. You are a junior doctor and have agreed with your fellow junior doctors to not come in to work tomorrow. You consultant rings you in the evening and asks you to come in tomorrow on the day of the strike as he is on his own on the ward. He also mentions your reference may not be ‘as excellent as it would be’ if you do not come in. How do you respond?

Station 8

Your local NHS has decided not to fund any future fertility treatments. It gives the reason that the country is overpopulated and there is no need to fund this treatment which it considers of low priority. Do you agree with this decision?

Station 9

We appreciate you have a choice of medical schools in your application. Why have you chosen to apply in particular to our medical school?

Station 10

We use a variety of learning methods to teach out students at this medical school. One of these is problem based learning. Do you think you are ready for this type of learning?

End of MMI Circuit

(c) 2018 Blue Peanut Medical Education

LEARN HOW TO APPROACH THESE STATIONS AND OTHERS THAT ARE USED ON MEDICAL SCHOOL INTERVIEWS FROM DOCTORS WHO TEACH AT MEDICAL SCHOOL.

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Medical School Interview Questions - Free full MMI Circuit

Blue Peanut has released a full example MMI Interview based on current medical school interview trends. This session is best undertaken in pairs, with one person acting as the examiner, and the second the candidate. The questions do not involve any role play or practical tasks.

  • The examiner reads the question to the student. The station is a total of 7 minutes including the time the examiner takes to ask the question.

  • The questions have a degree of vagueness about them. This is deliberate as to allow a spectrum of responses from candidates.

  • The student may wish the examiner to repeat the question, or pause for thought. We would advise no extra time is allowed for this. This would therefore reduce the time the student has to respond.

  • The examiner is permitted to define terms or help clarify instructions should the candidate be uncertain.

  • Station 6 has a list that the candidate needs to read. This is allowed for in the time permitted. You may wish to print this list separately to show the candidate.

  • At 7 minutes, the examiner must stop. A pause of 1 minute should pass before proceeding to the next question.

  • No feedback should be provided during the MMI interview.

Station 1

In 2016 the United Kingdom held a referendum in which the majority of the electorate voted to leave the European Union. This may result in the restriction of free movement of medical supplies including pharmaceuticals. How will this affect the patient at your local NHS hospital?

Station 2

You are a junior doctor working a busy casualty department. There has been a major road traffic accident and the paramedics bring in three casualties. They are followed by the press. The first is a policeman; he has wounds to his legs but is talking to you. The second appears to be the criminal wearing a balaclava; he is unconscious. The third appears to be a pregnant lady; she is crying and telling you she is worried about her baby. Who would you choose to see?

Station 3

I can see you have been on work experience. Tell me about some of the qualities that a good medical student would exhibit that you observed.

Station 4

You are a medical student attached to a respiratory ward at your local hospital. One of the doctors is smoking behind the reception desk, with the porter, in full view of the patients. Outline how you would proceed from here?

Station 5

I assume you have read our medical school prospectus and had a look at our website. Tell me your views regarding the teaching methods we use at our medical school.

Station 6

You are a passenger who is the sole survivor of a train crash. The train is in the middle of nowhere and it is getting dark. You decide to start walking down the track to the next station. You have a look through the wreckage and find the following items. Which three items will you choose to take with you? (The candidate is to be shown the list printed separately)

  1. A box of matches

  2. A mobile phone. There appears to be no signal at the crash site.

  3. A bag containing crisps and a bottle of pop

  4. Some antibiotic tablets

  5. A Swiss army knife – it has basic tools

  6. A torch. It does appear to be working

  7. Some blankets with ‘first class’ written on them

  8. A pack of cigarettes

  9. A wallet containing £100 in cash. There appears to be no ID.

  10. Some toiletries

Station 7

You are a GP who is arriving at a nursing home to see some patients. Unfortunately you run over the resident’s pet dog in the car park. No one has apparently seen you do this and there is no CCTV. The animal is lifeless. What do you do?

Station 8

You are at the airport with your friends. You are all about to travel abroad for a holiday which you have been planning for several months. As you waiting at check in one of your friends receives a phone call. He looks very distressed and tells you the local hospital was on the phone. His dad has been admitted to intensive care. What do you do?

Station 9

Your local clinical commissioning group has just appointed a new medical director. Is it important that doctors demonstrate leadership and can you give examples of where you showed leadership?

Station 10

You are working as a health care assistant in a GP practice in a deprived area of the country. Several of the parents are refusing permission for you to vaccinate their babies. They are worried about the negative side effects of vaccines. The local council proposes we do not allow children who have not been vaccinated a place in the local schools. What are your views on this proposal?

End of MMI Circuit

(c) 2018 Blue Peanut Medical Education

Learn how to approach these stations and others that are used on medical school interviews from doctors who teach at medical school. Have a look at our one day medical school interview course after which over 98% of students obtain an offer - CLICK HERE

MEDICAL SCHOOL INTERVIEW TRAINING BY DOCTORS FOR FUTURE DOCTORS

MEDICAL SCHOOL INTERVIEW TRAINING BY DOCTORS FOR FUTURE DOCTORS

Actors in MMI Interview Stations - Some tips

Some students have been asking us about the actors that are used in MMI stations. They can simulate any third party, for example a patient, a friend or even a stranger. The subject of the station might not even be medical. Remember St Georges have indicated on their website they have a station involving you speaking to your neighbour having run over her cat.

Medical School Interview Questions - MMI Circuit

Here are some example MMI stations for you to practice. You may wish to work in pairs for this activity with one student being the examiner and the other the applicant. This is a timed exercise. You have 7 minutes per station with a 2-minute break per station.

STATION 1

You are a medical student working in placement on a busy cardiology ward in a local hospital. You notice one of the junior doctors keeps going home early on a regular basis. He tells you not to mention this to anyone and says he will give you a good report at the end of your placement. The staff then has to call the on call doctor in the evening to finish off some of his work and this is happening several times a week.

What do you do next?

STATION 2

You are working on your own overnight in a busy hospital accident and emergency department. Two patients come in by ambulance. Both have been involved in a road traffic accident and appear to be unconscious. You recognise one of them as one of the general surgeons who works in the hospital. The paramedics tell you the other is a homeless person who was sleeping on the pavement when he was hit.

Which patient do you see first?

STATION 3

[Assume this question relates to your choice of medical school]

One of the most fundamental questions one has to ask is why you have chosen medicine? Why this medical school?

END STATIONS

If you find this exercise useful, please send us your comments and we can add more in future.

You can learn about how to answer such questions from a medical school tutor on our medical school interview course: -

Click here for details of the Blue Peanut Small Group Medical School Interview Course

Which medical school should I choose with a low UKCAT result?

The answer to this question is not straightforward. Reading through the entry requirements through the various medical school websites, you might want to consider the following: -

  • Some medical schools will rank students heavily on UKCAT score and use this to decide which candidates to call for interview. Avoid these, as a low score puts you at the bottom of the pile.

  • If there is a minimum UKCAT score – don’t apply if have not reached this in your exam!

  • Some elements of the UKCAT may be ignored – such as situational judgement. If this is only part of the exam that you did not do well in, then it may be worth considering this medical school.

  • If there is a low weighting for the UKCAT score then have a look. If there is a higher weighting for other areas of the application (such as personal statement) in your favour this may be one to go for.

  • The school can be vague in how it uses the UKCAT score. It way be worth ringing them up but you still may get a vague answer. An application to such an school is risky.

  • The school states there is no cut off but has put historical details, for example 'in the past no places were offered to candidates that had a score of…' Take these historic scores as guidance to how the same medical school is likely to behave this time.

  • The UKCAT score is used only in a tiebreaker situation. For example if two students perform equally well at interview. This may be worth consideration.

  • You could consider medical schools that do not require the UKCAT exam, or look at BMAT medical schools.

We did this exercise for a student last year (2018 Entry). Looking at all these factors, there was one medical school that stood out which was the University of Bristol. This places a 20% weighting on UKCAT score and a high 50% weighting on the personal statement (down from 10% UKCAT weighting last year). Even better, the university tell you on the website what they are looking for in your personal statement.  You could use our personal statement services to help you write your statement to fit this criterion – click here for details. Make sure you meet the other academic requirements of this medical school before you apply to any medical school!

There have been others that have placed lest emphasis on low UKCAT scores but the options for 2018 entry were even more limited. 

For 2019 entry, Cardiff used the UKCAT score in ‘borderline’ cases, meaning it could be an option if other elements of you application were strong. Both Keele and Plymouth had a UKCAT cut off but it was considered to be lower than other medical schools. Queen’s Belfast used the UKCAT but it had a relatively smaller weight in the process.

Have a look at our medical school interview course - Over 98% of our students successfully obtained an offer last year. Click Here for details.

What do medical schools look for in your UCAS personal statement?

Each medical school has its own criterion for evaluating a candidate’s personal statement. It can be used purely as a tool to decide who to call for interview, and therefore which applications to reject. The medical school may use the personal statement as a proportion of the overall assessment process (for example it forms a certain percentage of your overall assessment, combined with a score for interview, examination scores etc.)

Each university has its own scoring system for the contents of the statement. Your first point of call should be to look at the medical school website and if it gives you any details on what assessors are looking for on a personal statement, to make sure you include this. 

We have created a list of what medical schools will commonly look for:-

  • Motivation for a career in medicine

  • Your research into the demanding nature and requirements for a career in medicine

  • Demonstration of the caring as well as scientific side of medicine, perhaps through suitable work experience.

  • Evidence of participation in activities which demonstrate teamwork, leadership and other communication skills essential for being a doctor

  • Your participation in a suitable range of extracurricular activities and interests

  • The presence of awards or achievements outside normal academia

If you wish help writing your personal statement, we offer services to help you do this, from scratch if needed. Click here for our UCAS statement services.

Veterinary medicine – more complex questions - financial and ethical considerations

Veterinary medicine – more complex questions - financial and ethical considerations

We taught several students last year who were applying for veterinary medicine. The interviews tended to focus on broadly the same domains as medical school interviews. However, there are some important considerations. One of these is the financial impact of care. Whilst this is increasing becoming a consideration in deciding which treatments the NHS can fund, you are more likely to be exposed to such a consideration in a veterinary school MMI interview.

Medical School Interview - Communication Skills Stations

Medical School Interview - Communication Skills Stations

Medical schools are increasingly using live actors in MMI stations. A common scenario is where you have to use your initiative to resolve a conflict or a dilemma. From our knowledge of such assessments, the actor usually is briefed before the station and will have been told how to respond to what candidates say. They will usually not give away any information unless they are specifically asked.